Posts Tagged: history

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internetkatze:

artisansoulleader:

thepowerofmoonlight:

Learnt an interesting thing today on this arabic course,
The original Arabic number system looked like this, the one we now use.
It was designed so each character had the corresponding number of angles to the number, so the number 1 has 1 angle, 2 has 2 angles, 3 has 3, 0 has none etc…
It is so obvious now, I’ve always assumed its one of those things that just is, with no logical explanation, but here it is, perfectly simple and satisfying

My jaw is legit on the floor right about now :D

This is WRONG. COMPLETELY WRONG. I’ve seen this post on my dash at least ten times with no correction so here it is:

This is the evolution of the modern numeral system. PLEASE STOP SPREADING MISINFORMATION. The history of Mathematics is awesome and amazing and Arabs made tons and tons of progress and invented many of the concepts we use today, but a numeral system based on angles IS NOT ONE OF THEM.

internetkatze:

artisansoulleader:

thepowerofmoonlight:

Learnt an interesting thing today on this arabic course,

The original Arabic number system looked like this, the one we now use.

It was designed so each character had the corresponding number of angles to the number, so the number 1 has 1 angle, 2 has 2 angles, 3 has 3, 0 has none etc…

It is so obvious now, I’ve always assumed its one of those things that just is, with no logical explanation, but here it is, perfectly simple and satisfying

My jaw is legit on the floor right about now :D

This is WRONG. COMPLETELY WRONG. I’ve seen this post on my dash at least ten times with no correction so here it is:

image

This is the evolution of the modern numeral system. PLEASE STOP SPREADING MISINFORMATION. The history of Mathematics is awesome and amazing and Arabs made tons and tons of progress and invented many of the concepts we use today, but a numeral system based on angles IS NOT ONE OF THEM.

(via notsufferingfrominsanity)

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ifeelbetterer:

miwrighting:

kototyph:

leupagus:

killerville:

   

WOOED THE WORD YOU’RE LOOKING FOR IS WOOED

GUESS WHOSE TAGS ARE TOTALLY GETTING REBLOGGED

Star-struck Interviewer: “You must miss the good old days.”

Steve Rogers: “I grew up in a tenement slum. Rats, lice, bedbugs, one shared bathroom per floor with a bucket of water to flush, cast iron coal-burning stove for cooking and heat. Oh, and coal deliveries - and milk deliveries, if you could get it - were by horse-drawn cart. One summer I saw a workhorse collapse in the heat, and the driver started beating it with a stick to make it get up. We threw bricks at the guy until he ran away. Me and Bucky and our friends used to steal potatoes or apples from the shops. We’d stick them in tin cans with some hot ashes, tie the cans to some twine, and then swing ‘em around as long as we could to get the ashes really hot. Then we’d eat the potato. And there were the block fights. You don’t know what a block fight was? That’s when the Irish or German kids who lived on one block and the Jewish or Russian kids who lived on the next block would all get together into one big mob of ethnic violence and beat the crap out of each other. One time I tore a post out of a fence and used it on a Dutch kid who’d called Bucky a Mick. Smacked him in the head with the nails.”

Interviewer: “LET’S TALK ABOUT THE INTERNET.”

Steve Rogers: “I love cat pictures.”

(Many biographical details are taken from Streetwise, either from Jack Kirby’s autobiographical story or Nick Cardy’s contribution: http://twomorrows.com/index.php?main_page=product_info&cPath=52&products_id=513 )

it got better

(via ireaditinthepapersoitmustbetrue)

Source: forassgard
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historicalagentcarter:

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On Mondays, I’ll be focusing on an aspect of material culture (i.e. stuff) that would have been relevant to Peggy’s fictional life, and I thought today I’d write about what might have gone under Peggy’s tailored uniform, using as an example this 1942 American-made girdle from the collection of the Metropolitan Museum of Art (Source). The girdle is undoubtedly a garment Peggy would have been familiar with. I’m not saying Hayley Atwell isn’t a knockout, but there’s no way there wasn’t some kind of foundation garment underneath that red dress.

Girdles were essential foundation garments for many women in the early-mid 20th century. They are more closely related to modern shapewear than a corset, the main difference being that corsets aren’t by nature “stretchy,” while girdles will usually contain some kind of elastic material. In other words, the corset constricts; the girdle compresses and smooths. In the girdle above, you can see elastic panels set between silk panels. 

During the war, girdle manufacturers were quick to reassure women that they still needed their product. Girdles were redesigned to use less or no rubber (which was rationed at the time), and were also marketed as aids to women’s work during the war. This British advertisement markets a girdle specially designed for women workers, and touts approval by the British War Office.

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Below are some examples of 1940s underwear and foundation garments in action from the Life Magazine archives. These were taken at an underwear fashion and trade show by none other than famed photographer Alfred Eisenstaedt. 

You’ll notice that there’s not a lot of room for pantylines in the girdles in these photos, and I’m honestly not sure if panties were worn under girdles. 1940s panties were high waisted, and covered a few inches of the tops of the thighs (more like shorts than today’s briefs).

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These models are wearing girdles with stockings attached. The ruffle at the bottom is likely a special addition for this show/event. Bras of this period are full coverage, and often characterized by the seam running across the widest part of the bust, which you can see here. Bras were usually fairly plain in the 40s, and colored white, ivory, or peachy pink. Fasteners were metal hooks and eyes, as they are today. 

The same color scheme generally goes for other kinds of undergarments, though at the first link at the bottom of the post, there’s a photo from the same show of a slightly racier black or colored set (it’s hard to tell in a black and white photo).

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These models are wearing corselets, which are essentially full length girdle/bras. 

Over any of these foundation garments would go a slip, then a dress.

Here’s a bonus shot of A’lure’s “Alphabet Brassieres” display from the same show. Before I became a museologist, I spent too many years working in a lingerie shop, and these attitudes towards size really haven’t changed all that much.

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To see the full series of Eisenstaedt photos, click here.

To read more about 1940s undergarments, click here.

Click here to see images of how girdle manufacturers marketed their products during the war.

(via destronomics)

Source: historicalagentcarter
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amodernmanifesto:

Seriously what’s with all the glorification of Sparta for its apparent gender equality, etc on tumblr.

It was a fucking horrible place, with a massive class of serfs called Helots who were tied to the land and hunted for sport by the Spartans.

The primary reason why homosexuality flourished amongst men (less is known about women) in the Greek city-states was because it was a slave based society, where social reproduction of the labour force was not as essential as in other class societies (because the bulk of the labour force were bought and sold after being stolen).

(via thelunaticyouarelookingfor)

Source: amodernmanifesto
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  • Western Society: Pink is such a strong vibrant color, fit for masculine boys. Blue is fit for the girls.
  • Hitler: Pink is gay lol
  • Western Society: QUICK, Pink is feminine for girls, boys have the blue!
Source: charlesoberonn
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ultrafacts:

panichristie:

erisdogwood:

ultrafacts:

chocolatesprinklesroyale:

ultrafacts:

Source More Facts

Guards: Oh no. Wait. Stop. No. Don’t steal those. Get back here, you criminal. (Pfft! Can’t believe they’re falling for it!)

I read that in a sarcastic voice

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stop

(via notsufferingfrominsanity)

Source: ultrafacts
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blackhistoryalbum:

A young “Miss Maggie” Walker, the daughter of a former slave, who in 1903 became the first woman of any race to found and become president of an American bank. She also founded a newspaper and a department store called “Saint Luke’s Emporium.”

Courtesy of the Maggie L. Walker National Historic Site

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Source: pinterest.com
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