Posts Tagged: culture

Photo Set

stories-yet-to-be-written:

13 Striking Portraits That Challenge Society’s Views of Sikh Men

1. Gurjeevan Singh Plahe

2. Magic Singh - Magician

3. Asa Singh - Highway Planner

4. Gurbir Singh - Polo Player

5. Chaz Singh Fliy - Creative Director

6. Ishtmeet Singh Phull - Student

7. Roop Singh - Sikh Storyteller

8. Darshan Singh Bhooi - Retired Businessman

9. Amanpreet Singh - Temple Volunteer

10. Hardeep Singh Kohli - Comedian, Writer, Presenter

Project by Amit & Naroop via Identities.Mic

(via theeverydaygoth)

Source: stories-yet-to-be-written
Photo

gayonthemoon1239:

rifa:

actualbloggerwangyao:

alvaroandtheworld:

ultrafacts:

Source For more posts like this, follow Ultrafacts

THE BEGINNINGS OF KAWAII

No, no, you have no idea. It actually IS the beginning of the whole so-called “kawaii culture”. And it started because girls started using mechanical pencils, which provided fine handwriting. After being banished (more precisely, during the 80s), this kind of writing started being used in products like magazines and make-up. And, during this time, icons we usually associate with the whole kawaii industry (like the characters from Sanrio) came to life too.

And what many people don’t realize is that this subculture was born as a way for young girls to express themselves in their own way. And it was also used as something against the adult life and the traditional culture, often seen as dull and boring and oppressive. By embracing cuteness, these young girls (and adult women, after a while) were showing non-conformation with the current standards.

So yep. Kawaii is important, and it all started with cute, simple handwritting a few hearts and cat faces in some girls’ school notebooks <3


!!!!!

NO OK THIS IS SO IMPORTANT!

This is also how the kawaii fashions started! Girls began dressing in cute and off beat styles for themsleves, they were criticized by adult figures telling them “you’ll never find a husband if you dress that way!” to which they began to reply “Good!”

All the japanese subcultures and fashions that evolved out of this became a rebellion to tradition and the starch gender roles and expectations the adults were forcing on the younger generations. As early as the 70s and still to this day you’ll see an emphasis on child-like fashion and themes in more kawaii styles and the dismissal of the male gaze with styles like lolita (a lot of western people assume lolita is somehow sexual due to the name of the fashion, but ask any japanese lolita and they will tell you that men hate the style and find it unattractive which is sometimes a large reason they gravitate towards the style - they can express their femininity and individuality while remaining independent and without the pressure to appeal to men)

Its so so so important to understand the hyper cute and ‘odd’ fashions of Japanese girls carry such a huge message of feminism and reclaiming of their own lives.   

so are you telling me that Japan’s punk phase was really the kawaii phase

(via nooby-banana)

Source: ultrafacts
Text

archaeologicalnews:

image

LOS ANGELES, CA.- African Cosmos: Stellar Arts is the first major exhibition to explore the historical legacy of African cultural astronomy and its intersection with traditional and contemporary African arts. Documented since the kingdoms of ancient Egypt, for thousands of years Africans throughout the continent have contemplated the celestial firmament and conceived stories about the heavenly bodies. People of many cultures have used such observations to navigate their physical environments and to regulate agricultural and ritual calendars.

African Cosmos considers how the sun, moon, and stars, as well as ephemeral phenomena such as lightning and thunder, serve as sources of philosophical contemplation in the creation of arts from historical times to the present. Far from abstract concepts, African notions of the universe can be intensely personal, placing human beings in relationships with earth and sky. Read more.

Source: archaeologicalnews
Text

bornabitch-allthedaysandnights:

trungles:

theblacksophisticate:

feminism5ever:

When people say “culture is meant to be shared” I’m literally like ???? Because that has literally never been the purpose of any culture. Culture is about identity, community and family. It’s about tradition. It is not and has never been about “sharing”.

Say it!

They keep saying “shared” when they mean “made available for my consumption.”

and boom goes the dynamite

(via fyeahcracker)

Source: feminism5ever
Text

sandchigger:

cheskamouse:

xekstrin:

Ok but: Muslims in space. How do they pray? You know? This really bothers me. This should be addressed in more science fiction.

Toward earth?

Malaysia (a Muslim country) actually came up with answers to these questions after they had a few astronauts launched into orbit.

Link

(via snowinacan)

Source: xekstrin
Text

allofthefeelings:

stopthatimp:

gyzym:

there’s all this stuff  about steve discovering modern music and don’t get me wrong i am About That but i just want to make sure we talk about how many songs would be about steve, in the mcu as it stands. steve is a cultural icon! steve is a national symbol! the line in don mclean’s american pie would be “the day the captain died!” there would be a springsteen song about how like, the narrator found himself driving into brooklyn with mary and they laid out on the hood of his truck and he thought about days gone by when captain america wandered these streets! there’d be a steve rogers version of candle in the wind!

just think about it, okay, sam constantly putting the songs on steve’s ipod and totally knowing when they were playing, because steve would get all uncomfortable when they came on and like, weird about it, but also, you know, a little bit like

image

and it’d be so beautiful, man. it’d be so beautiful.

Only Sam didn’t rec Steve white artists from New Jersey. I think the bigger argument is, who exactly “owns” Captain America, culturally? He’s canonically a New Deal democrat - is his legacy regularly trampled the way, say, Dr Seuss’ is? Are songs about him as routinely misinterpreted as Born In The USA? He’s the ultimate symbol of patriotism - how is that symbol used? Sam’s taste, or at least what he’s reccing Steve, is tending towards old-school Motown, maybe some jazz, rhythm and blues - would black artists even embrace Captain America? I kind of doubt it. I think if anything, you’d see some tension between the kind of music Sam’s reccing Steve, and the kind of music that would proudly and repeatedly reference Steve, even if that music is Springsteen-style progressive.

Oh god oh god oh god, imagine no one telling Steve about Isaiah Bradley until Sam recommends a song to him and he researches what it’s about and is suddenly breaking down all the doors in the US government because why the fuck do I have a Smithsonian exhibit and Isaiah Bradley doesn’t even have an official biography???

(via historicallyaccuratesteve)

Source: gyzym
Quote

"If your ancestors cut down all the trees, it’s not your fault, but you still don’t live in a forest."

-

Pam Oliver, a professor in the UW-Madison sociology department, explaining the historical roots of racism in the United States to her undergraduate students (mostly middle-class and White).  I try to use this when I teach race now, too, to get past the defensive “but why are you BLAMING ME” reaction. (via cabell)

THIS. THIS THIS THIS THIS THIS THIS THIS.

To all the white people who say that they shouldn’t have responsibility in racism because they’re ancestors and not them who participated in slavery, think about this!

(via iamabutchsolo)

(via snowinacan)

Source: cabell
Quote

"Dystopian worlds have become very popular lately. Whether it is Revolution, Falling Skies, The Walking Dead or Defiance, the one thing they all have in common is straight, cisgender, able bodied White male leadership. This suggests that at the end of the day, no matter the circumstance White masculinity represents authority, logic, safety, and intelligence. People of colour and women are often relegated to side characters who week after week submit to this authority and often times appear to be grateful for it. It is no accident that the White male is so revered in dystopians. It plays upon the idea that White straight masculinity is a declining power because of resistance by women, people of colour and of course GLBT people. It suggests that there will come a time when nature will correct itself and once again White men will rule the world, as though that is not the current situation and further; the world will be grateful for it."

-

Dystopians: The Leadership of Cis, Straight, White, Able-Bodied Men

(via avioletmind)

vilecrocodile

 WEAK give me dystopias where marginalized people thrive because they have more experience living with fear and the threat of violence give me dystopias where double conciousness becomes even more of a valuable survival skill give me dystopias where cis white able bodied men die sooner and in greater numbers survival in nightmarsish societies where you are the bottom of the food chain is not something that has or ever will belong to straight cis …able bodied white men straight white abled cis masculinity is not psychologically geared for survival

ho shiiiiiiiit gimme gimme gimme post-apocalyptic worlds in which zombies only hunt humans demonstrating certain behavioral cues and releasing pheromones that convey aggression (like how horses can “sense” untrained riders). so that the survivors are the code-switchers, the disenfranchised who’ve learned from an early age how to modify their behavior to suit a hostile social space.

{the zombies are preferable to the cisgender able-bodied straight white men, bc the zombies actually leave you alone}

(via squintyoureyes)

(via thelunaticyouarelookingfor)

Quote

"Fixed time cultures perceive time technically. A minute is sixty seconds: “Time is money”, and can be spent, used, and wasted. “On time” means technically ‘on time’, and apologies are expected between 1 and 5 minutes after, depending how close to fixed time the culture is. […] American, German and Swiss cultures are particularly conscious of technical time. Fluid time defines punctuality with more flexibility. Subito in Italian technically means “immediately”. It is the standard reply given by those in the service industry when being asked for service. The informal meaning is “I’ll be with you when I have finished what I am doing”. In fluid-time cultures, delays are expected and tolerated. A meeting can start fifteen to thirty minutes late depending on the culture without undue tension being created. Those with a fixed-time orientation have difficulty in comprehending the Italian informal but institutionalized quarto d’ora accademico / “the university fifteen minute sliding start” much loved by Italian academics and students alike. It is always useful to check which time is being talked about: e.g. “German time”, “Italian academic time”, “Neapolitan time”, “Milan time”, and so on."

- Katan, David (2004), Translating Cultures: An Introduction for Translators, Mediators and Interpreters (Terminologia etc. » » Torno subito… ma quanto subito?)

(via punnyknitwit)

Source: blog.terminologiaetc.it
Photo
deepbones:

Listen, when you use a word of hate ironically — like, and your defense is “I’m not racist, how could you ever think I’m racist??” I want you to imagine owning a gun, but never buying live ammunition. You only purchase blanks. Ok? And say sometimes when you hang out with your close friends, you take out your gun, which they know contains no live ammunition, and you shoot it at stuff, and you think it’s funny. And maybe the first time you do it, they’re like “Shit. I mean, I know those are blanks, but that’s kind of fucked up,” but your argument is, “But I can’t really hurt anyone! They’re just blanks!” And over time they just get used to it and find it kind of funny. “Oh, that Cliff, sometimes he takes his gun out and shoots some blanks, but he doesn’t really mean anything. It’s just funny! You know how it goes.” Now, imagine that over time, having received the acceptance for your actions from your friends, you decide you can start firing blanks around people you’ve never met. In mixed company. You’re at a dinner party one night, you’ve had a few, so you go “Hey, wanna see something cool?!” and those who are your friends at the party know what’s coming, so they’re prepared, but then the people who don’t know you, they see you whip out a piece and go “Oh shit, I’m going to die, it’s everything I feared,” but your friends explain to them it’s not a big deal, there’s nothing to be afraid of, “Cliff wouldn’t hurt a fly,” so they eventually, begrudgingly, don’t say anything about it, don’t call you, Cliff, a fucking asshole. “Fine, it’s kind of ridiculous, but whatever.” Something like that. And then you are at a large public place. A concert, an open mic, where you and your friends are outnumbered by the rest of the audience. And maybe someone pushes you or gives you a hard time, so you decide, just to give the guy a taste of his own medicine, to pull out your gun, and fire some blanks. Give him a real, real visceral jump. And everyone around you feels threatened, unsafe, about to be part of something they were always on some subconscious level afraid would happen, but at the same time hopeful it would never happen because our society’s getting smarter and more considerate of those around them. And then some other people, who after seeing it happen, feel relieved that you were firing blanks, but also feel empowered by your choice to fire a weapon in a public place, and choose to do the same thing. Do you get it yet? The fact is that derogatory remarks, whether used sincerely or ironically, and ammunition, whether blank or live, still creates the same environment of discomfort and fear every time it is used. So cut the shit.
- Junot Diaz

deepbones:

Listen, when you use a word of hate ironically — like, and your defense is “I’m not racist, how could you ever think I’m racist??” I want you to imagine owning a gun, but never buying live ammunition. You only purchase blanks. Ok?

And say sometimes when you hang out with your close friends, you take out your gun, which they know contains no live ammunition, and you shoot it at stuff, and you think it’s funny. And maybe the first time you do it, they’re like “Shit. I mean, I know those are blanks, but that’s kind of fucked up,” but your argument is, “But I can’t really hurt anyone! They’re just blanks!” And over time they just get used to it and find it kind of funny. “Oh, that Cliff, sometimes he takes his gun out and shoots some blanks, but he doesn’t really mean anything. It’s just funny! You know how it goes.”

Now, imagine that over time, having received the acceptance for your actions from your friends, you decide you can start firing blanks around people you’ve never met. In mixed company. You’re at a dinner party one night, you’ve had a few, so you go “Hey, wanna see something cool?!” and those who are your friends at the party know what’s coming, so they’re prepared, but then the people who don’t know you, they see you whip out a piece and go “Oh shit, I’m going to die, it’s everything I feared,” but your friends explain to them it’s not a big deal, there’s nothing to be afraid of, “Cliff wouldn’t hurt a fly,” so they eventually, begrudgingly, don’t say anything about it, don’t call you, Cliff, a fucking asshole. “Fine, it’s kind of ridiculous, but whatever.” Something like that.

And then you are at a large public place. A concert, an open mic, where you and your friends are outnumbered by the rest of the audience. And maybe someone pushes you or gives you a hard time, so you decide, just to give the guy a taste of his own medicine, to pull out your gun, and fire some blanks. Give him a real, real visceral jump. And everyone around you feels threatened, unsafe, about to be part of something they were always on some subconscious level afraid would happen, but at the same time hopeful it would never happen because our society’s getting smarter and more considerate of those around them. And then some other people, who after seeing it happen, feel relieved that you were firing blanks, but also feel empowered by your choice to fire a weapon in a public place, and choose to do the same thing.

Do you get it yet?

The fact is that derogatory remarks, whether used sincerely or ironically, and ammunition, whether blank or live, still creates the same environment of discomfort and fear every time it is used. So cut the shit.

- Junot Diaz

(via snowinacan)

Source: deepbones