Posts Tagged: art history

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nitratediva:

SAVE THE WORLD’S OLDEST FILM SET! Universal Studios’ Stage 28 has a lot of memories. Parts of Dracula, Torn Curtain, and The Sting were filmed there, to name only a few. Built for the silent Phantom of the Opera (1925), the original Paris opera sets are still there. Some say the soundstage is haunted—but those ghosts might be homeless soon.
Because the word is that Universal plans to tear down this landmark of Hollywood history.
If you want to save Stage 28, SIGN THIS PETITION NOW. And also sign this one. This is really important. It’s part of our cultural heritage.
I don’t like to ask favors of you lovely people who follow me, but please, please, please do this. Together you are mighty enough to reach the goal.

nitratediva:

SAVE THE WORLD’S OLDEST FILM SET! Universal Studios’ Stage 28 has a lot of memories. Parts of Dracula, Torn Curtain, and The Sting were filmed there, to name only a few. Built for the silent Phantom of the Opera (1925), the original Paris opera sets are still there. Some say the soundstage is haunted—but those ghosts might be homeless soon.

Because the word is that Universal plans to tear down this landmark of Hollywood history.

If you want to save Stage 28, SIGN THIS PETITION NOW. And also sign this one. This is really important. It’s part of our cultural heritage.

I don’t like to ask favors of you lovely people who follow me, but please, please, please do this. Together you are mighty enough to reach the goal.

(via pinstripehourglass)

Source: nitratediva
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congenitalprogramming:

sterlingsea:

shellbow:

contemporaryelfinchild:

nowisthewinter:

peternyc:

Photo of a fight in the Ukranian Parliament or Renaissance painting? 

Slap them all in togas instead of suits and it would perfect

It also follows a pyramidal composition!

However, I would argue that this picture is more Baroque than Renaissance. Notable features of Baroque art are:

  • Images are direct, obvious, and dramatic.
  • Tries to draw the viewer in to participate in the scene.
  • Depictions feel physically and psychologically real. Emotionally intense.
  • Extravagant settings and ornamentation.
  • Dramatic use of color.
  • Dramatic contrasts between light and dark, light and shadow.
  • As opposed to Renaissance art with its clearly defined planes, with each figure placed in isolation from each other, Baroque art has continuous overlapping of figures and elements.
  • Common themes: grandiose visions, ecstasies and conversions, martyrdom and death, intense light, intense psychological moments.

In the baroque, artists strove to evoke aesthetic responses. Now I’m not talking about aesthetic as in “oh thats pretty” I’m talking about aesthetic like that punch in the gut reaction you get to something.

One of the ways this was done was through the depiction of intense emotion which we see in this photograph. compare to Bernini

The picture also displays a wonderful use of chiaroscuro (an effect of contrasted light and shadow created by light falling unevenly or from a particular direction on something) a style used extensively by Caravaggio and other Baroque artists.

 

oh my god

This post keeps getting better.

(via punnyknitwit)

Source: peternyc
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amorydreams:

Today I learned that a composer named Erwin Schulhoff wrote a completely tacet piece as the third movement of his “Fünf Pittoresken" for piano. His piece pre-dates John Cage’s 4’33” by 30 years, and is actually much more suggestive as to how the silence should be shaped, containing really complex rhythmic rests and lines to the rests. His successful career was cut short due to the Rise of the Nazi Regime in Germany and their strict rules on music, and because of this, his pieces are very rarely played or referenced to.

(via notsufferingfrominsanity)

Source: amorydreams
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ancientart:

One very fancy ancient spoon. 

Intended to be used for ointment, this Egyptian spoon with a pivoting lid is made of ivory and dates to ca. 1336-1327 BCE.

The late Eighteenth Dynasty was one of the the most flamboyant and excessive periods of design in Egyptian history. This spoon demonstrates the dominant aesthetic of the day: the complementary union of naturalistic elements, formal design, and excessive, stylized detailing.

The motif is a pomegranate branch terminating in a huge reddish-yellow fruit that swivels on a tiny pivot to reveal the bowl of the spoon. Tiny pomegranates, brightly painted flowers, and slender leaves project from the stem that serves as the handle. Beneath the lowest leaves the artisan has added an extraordinary embellishment: two lotus flowers, each with a Mimispos fruit emerging from it.

Although the individual elements of the spoon are treated with painstaking attention to detail, the design itself is pure fantasy. For example, pomegranate flowers and fruit never appear on a tree at the same time. (-Brooklyn Museum)

Courtesy of & currently located at the Brooklyn Museum, via their online collections42.411.

Source: ancientart
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ancientart:

Foundation plaques B (photo 1) and A (photo 2), dating to the early 4th century BCE. Both these plaques of hammered gold have been inscribed in Old Persian, and are from Iran during the Achaemenid period.

Artefacts courtesy of the Cincinnati Art Museum, Ohio, USA. Photos taken by Daderot via the Wiki Commons.

Source: ancientart
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pantskit:

huntyjpg:

pantskit:

I JSUT FUCKING FOUND THE ORIGINAL ARTIST OF GOTTA GO FAST

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I WAS ON GODDAMN WAYBACK MACHINE ON SONIC CENTRAL AND THIS IS LITERALLY IT

POSTED AUGUST 2004

THE BIRTH OF A LEGEND

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r u telling me this meme is 10 years old???? is this the oldest meme ever???? what is the oldest meme ever?????

thank you for reminding me that it is now the 10th anniversary of gotta go fast. bless you

i bet star wars kid is from, like, 1999. and i don’t think numa numa guy was but a few years later.

i’m assuming we’re talking internet viral material here, and even then i doubt those qualify as “first”

(via billyrandomnerd)

Source: pantskit
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likeafieldmouse:

Marcel Duchamp - Nude Descending a Staircase, No. 2 (1912)

(via jlr7245)

Source: likeafieldmouse
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gdfalksen:

Interior of a Rolls Royce Phantom 1, 1926.

Source: the-randy-dandy