Posts Tagged: acting

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sapphofragments:

a tv show that’s just the guy who does the voice of Archer and the guy who does the voice of Brock from Venture Bros. screaming at each other

(via hey-mayonegg)

Source: giannis-antetokounmpo
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hiphopfightsplaque:

Yo tell me about Will Smith and his “non existent” father one more fucking time tumblr folk.

Because y’know, it’s not like he’s an actor who is able to act like a kid who grew up without a dad.

articles 1 and 2

(via fyeahcracker)

Source: hiphopfightsplaque
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chess-ka:

A friend and I once ran into Jonathan Hyde (Van Pelt) in a pub after seeing him in a production of “King Lear”. My friend said, “Your character in Jumanji gave me nightmares when I was 7.”

Hyde looked him straight in the eye, stepped really close so they were basically nose-to-nose, and said: “Good.”

Then he walked away. What a dude.

(via notsufferingfrominsanity)

Source: iremonez
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seaofolives:

Tom and Chris moments in Thor: The Dark World gag reel → Campy Chris

And Nat Portman looking reeeally, really awkward in the background.

(via ringasunn)

Source: seaofolives
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eppiesue:

thefleetstreetvicomte:

thefleetstreetvicomte:

inallyourfantasies:

Apparently Judi Dench got bored one day and they created a Les Mis barricade character for her in  May 2004 for just one performance.

Holy shit that must have  been hilarious to see.

Here’s a picture:

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Dame Judi Dench in Les Mis (May 2004)

"As the show started, the announcement was made: ‘At tonight’s performance the role of Javert will be played by Nic Greenshields, the role of Enjolras will be played by Alexis James, and in Act Two in the barricade scene Dame Judi Dench will appear as Madam Lafarge’.

"And, indeed, Dame Judi appeared in a suitably drab costume and mob-cap. She handed some ammunition up the barricade; she helped tie Javert to the chair; she was then hit by a flying bullet and sank dramatically over a table and was then helped offstage by one of the chorus. In total - say just under two minutes onstage!

"Dame Judi is appearing in the theatre next door and apparently has some 45 minutes between scenes. Yesterday she popped next door and said it would be fun if she could walk on at the start of the barricade scene since she had the time available and is a great fan of ‘Les Mis’. They had a quick five minute rehearsal between shows yesterday and tonight - on she went."
(source including more photos)

(via notsufferingfrominsanity)

Source: thesecretyouknow
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fuckyeahbehindthescenes:

To get the feel of acting with cartoon characters, Bob Hoskins studied his three-year-old daughter playing with her imaginary friends.
Who Framed Roger Rabbit (1988)
Rest In Peace Bob Hoskins

fuckyeahbehindthescenes:

To get the feel of acting with cartoon characters, Bob Hoskins studied his three-year-old daughter playing with her imaginary friends.

Who Framed Roger Rabbit (1988)

Rest In Peace Bob Hoskins

(via itswalky)

Source: fuckyeahbehindthescenes
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ittygittydiddynator:

anderjak:

toastradamus:

Roger Rabbits special effects still fucking hold up by todays standards AND looks better than most films that come out NOW it was that ahead of its time

I’m still amazed that Hoskins had that little to work with. Everything about this video is awesome.

This made my day.

(via nooby-banana)

Source: toastradamus
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aposse:

Let me tell you about the sheer brilliance that is Meryl Streep and her creation of Miranda Priestly.

Ask any young woman what her favourite film of Meryl’s would be, and I’m quite certain that The Devil Wears Prada would come up in conversation, favourite or not. And it may seem like a generic answer: oh, a film about fashion, so obviously women would identify with it. No, that’s not it. This film isn’t about fashion. This film, as Meryl says, “is a story about a woman at the head of a corporate ladder who’s misunderstood, who’s motives and pressures on her are intense and who doesn’t have time to play certain nice games.”

And though screentime and first bill casting can indicate that Andrea Sachs is the main character, who are you really left thinking about at the end of the film?

Miranda Priestly — the woman who was written as a fictional equivalent to Anna Wintour from the novelist Lauren Weisberger’s experience as her assistant — in the novel was a raging, two-dimensional boss from Hell written only to antagonize and complicate the lives of her employees with impossible standards and even more impossible demands. She was expected to resemble Vogue’s editor-in-chief (Miranda’s office in the film a near replica of Anna’s), so imagine everyone’s fucking surprise the first day Meryl showed up on set wearing an untested wig white as snow, with a voice that never raised, where the most deadly delivery was a whisper.

But this scene on the right, this scene that hadn’t existed until Meryl went and thought, “wait a minute, there’s an imbalance of character here…” so she brought it to light and this was written. Sparingly, as it was said, yet one of the very few scenes to be altered in the entire film. This is how it went: Meryl showed up to the scene without any make-up. She walked in, didn’t talk to anybody, sat down and did it, got up and left, went downstairs and waited. She did this scene once.

Once. 

Once.

And the thing is, this wasn’t meant for you to suddenly cheer for Miranda; it was to show you that she was human and that her success came with a costly price that hurt her the most. She thawed the Snow Queen, extinguished the flames of the fiery boss from Hell and gave her what she never had on paper: substance.

If completely reinventing a character from a subpar novel by giving her actual character and successfully distinguishing her from the woman she was based on isn’t considered pure talent, then I don’t know what is.

(via notsufferingfrominsanity)

Source: aposse
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almaviva90:

Anthony Hopkins as Audrey and Derek Jacobi as Touchstone in the all-male National Theatre production of As You Like It, 1967

"Anthony Hopkins struggled with the part of Audrey and threatened to bolt, but the role came into focus when he first donned a practice skirt (Sunday Times, 1 Oct. 1967). Hopkins put his discomfort to work, creating a performance that seemed ‘to have grown out of embarrassment’ and became the ‘funniest’ of them all, his Audrey ‘a bass-voiced Brunnhilde who sits expressionlessly through Touchstone’s advances and then grasps him in a bear-hug’ (Times, 4 Oct. 1967). At one point she thwacked him with a paddle. Derek Jacobi’s Touchstone ‘managed the incredible feat of making this clown actually very funny’, also contributing to the visual disorientation by being ‘prettier than any of the girls’ (Evening Standard, 4 Oct. 1967; Times, 4 Oct. 1967).” – Cynthia Marshall (ed.), Shakespeare in Production: As You Like It (2004), p. 75.

(via punnyknitwit)

Source: almaviva90
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unwillingadventurer:

William Hartnell doing his close to the face hand gestures. Apparently Hartnell gave his fellow actors the same lecture about gesturing close to the face on ‘as live’ television as you never knew when you were going to get a close up.

Hartnell is sometimes criticised for forgetting lines and such but his performance and presence as the Doctor is just so strong. Watch him in scenes, in the background, watch his eyes dart back and forth, the curiosity, the wonder. Watch his hands tremble slightly, and watch as he interrupts with the best precision, and watch how he commands the scenes without saying much at all. When people say that Hartnell is just the actor who forgets his lines we get so sad because acting is so much more than the lines, and when he couldn’t remember, he made up for it with his mannerisms and his physicality and authority. 

It didn’t matter that his sentences came out wrong sometimes, he was boss and you’d listen to him. You still believed in him.

(via doctorwho)

Source: unwillingadventurer